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The future of the KHL


Guest yave1964

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The Khl has established itself as a alternative to the NHL, kind of a European version of the old WHA. During the free agency period that has just passed, we have watched them sign among others....

Russians returning home in after proving unable to adjust to the North American game either on or off the ice, such as Filitav, Radulov and Engqvist.

North American borderline players such as Erik Christenson, Trevor Gillies, and andrew Raycroft, looking for a chance to reestablish themselves or continue their careers.

Europeans heading home for one last big payday such as Sami Pahlsson, Sami Lepisto or Niklas Hagman.

The Khl and other european leagues have provided a way for former stars to continue their careers long after their prime, players such as Slava Kozlov, Sergei Federov, Jagr, Donald Brashear,J.P. Dumont, Alexander Frolov, Martin Gerber, Rob Niedermayer, Jarkko Ruutu, Martin Straka, Miroslav Satan among others dot the european landscape. The Khl also is a breeding ground for top prospects, some such as Evgeny Kuznetsov who has his North American rights owned by the Capitals seem quite content to stay in their home country long after the Capitals want him to come over here.

Where does this league go from here? The tragic plane crash that killed the entire Lokomotiv hockey team, including former NHLers Pavol Demitra, Ruslan Salei amd Brad Mccrimon among the deceased set back the league in the eyes of the world, but they are ready to move forward in a big way. The elite league in europe, with apologies to the Elitserien league in Sweden, I see them making a big splash among NHL free agents in the next couple of years.

Imagine, Shea Weber signing a two year, fifty million dollar contract to play for Minsk. It could happen.

some time in the near future, a Canadien farm boy, a Flin Flonner if you will, will cause nashing of the teeth and rending of the clothes by signing with Moscow or Dinamo Riiga. Brett Hull did it with the WHA, it is bound to happen with this upstart league which is getting legs. And after one, there will be more. Ovechkin, Datsyuk or a Kovalchuk returning home while still in their prime is almost a certainty. The Russian league is here to stay and is now ready to be a threat to the NHL.

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The National Hockey League and Kontinental Hockey League have extended their agreement for another year which calls for each to work together on the transfer of players between the leagues.

The announcement was posted on the Russia-based KHL's website. The extension runs through June 30, 2013.

Both parties are required to "do everything in their power to reach a consensus" in the case of a disputed contract. The leagues have never had a conflict over a transfer, KHL president Alexander Medvedev said.

The NHL and KHL are also obliged to exchange contract details and free-agent lists and will communicate any changes.

Medvedev and NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly signed the agreement, the KHL said.

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The reason for that is the potential of a strike could force NHLers to play in Europe and this will in theory force the KHL to honor NHL contracts. In Theory.

So lets say the strike starts, October gets wiped out, followed by November. Some players decide to sign to finish out the season in the KHL, and the strike gets settled. It is gonna get messy.

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@yave1964 Wouldn't the plalyers just demand contracts with an in season opt out clause? Basically, they are free to go when the NHL starts up. The KHL team gets elite talent it wouldn't normally have, draws a tons of fans to see the stars and the players get paid on a per game played scenario...I could see that working. Plus, it exposes the NHL players to the KHL, so they know what it's like when they can no longer hang in the NHL but want to make a few mill at 38 years old.

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Sure the players could demand a opt out clause, but lets say you have a pending free agent the following year, and the KHL signs them to a two or three year contract. The strike settles in January or so, and the player decides to ignore his NHL contract to stay in his home country. Then a true war breaks out between the two leagues, a war that seems that most of the talent is over here the NHL has the most to lose. I am not chicken little crying the sky is falling, this is likely to happen if the lockout/strike goes for too long.

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Word of mouth will stop a lot of players from signing in the K. I can see borderline players going there for more money. But it's a whole different world over there. Unless you get signed by Moscow or somewhere close, you're likely going to be stuck in some industrial revolution time warped hellhole you only envisioned in nightmares. I doubt there will ever be much of an exodus, barring a lockout.

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I doubt there will ever be much of an exodus, barring a lockout.

That is kind of my point. In the event of a lockout, european teams offering two or three year contracts for favorite sons to return home will be common. Some will take them, you know, the old be it ever so humble and all that.

A major sticking point with the owners is they want ten years in the league before you can become an UFA. An absurd amount of time based off the other major sports, dont see it happening.

Lets look at Shea Weber, and keep in mind I am strictly speculating. He has six years in, is scheduled to be an UFA at the end of the upcoming season. Lets say that come January the NHL and players agree to a contract with UFA pushed back to eight years, costing Weber another year in Nashville. He comes across as a stubbon cuss, what if he signs with Moscow for two or three years at 20-25 million a year? It could happen. Then the war begins in earnest between the two leagues. The peace has been very uneasy since the KHL fired the first shot a few years ago with Jiri Hudler and Alexander Radulov. The lockout, strike if it occurs will cost the NHL more than just money, if they cannot work things out instead of losing a Pahlsson they may lose the Sedins or Ovie.

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@yave1964 It can't be to bad having a few more Canadians and Americans in the NHL....sure it hurts having some stars leave, but if they are leaving, how *into* the Stanley Cup are they anyways?

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Any cut in quality is going to hurt the game. And I think the European exodus could occur as they return home, but wouldnt be surprised if they dont steal more than a few canadien/United states boys as well. Nashville losing a Shea Weber and being forced to replace him with a Ryan Parent would be very harmful to the game.

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  • 1 year later...

The Khl has established itself as a alternative to the NHL, kind of a European version of the old WHA. During the free agency period that has just passed, we have watched them sign among others....

Russians returning home in after proving unable to adjust to the North American game either on or off the ice, such as Filitav, Radulov and Engqvist.

North American borderline players such as Erik Christenson, Trevor Gillies, and andrew Raycroft, looking for a chance to reestablish themselves or continue their careers.

Europeans heading home for one last big payday such as Sami Pahlsson, Sami Lepisto or Niklas Hagman.

The Khl and other european leagues have provided a way for former stars to continue their careers long after their prime, players such as Slava Kozlov, Sergei Federov, Jagr, Donald Brashear,J.P. Dumont, Alexander Frolov, Martin Gerber, Rob Niedermayer, Jarkko Ruutu, Martin Straka, Miroslav Satan among others dot the european landscape. The Khl also is a breeding ground for top prospects, some such as Evgeny Kuznetsov who has his North American rights owned by the Capitals seem quite content to stay in their home country long after the Capitals want him to come over here.

Where does this league go from here? The tragic plane crash that killed the entire Lokomotiv hockey team, including former NHLers Pavol Demitra, Ruslan Salei amd Brad Mccrimon among the deceased set back the league in the eyes of the world, but they are ready to move forward in a big way. The elite league in europe, with apologies to the Elitserien league in Sweden, I see them making a big splash among NHL free agents in the next couple of years.

Imagine, Shea Weber signing a two year, fifty million dollar contract to play for Minsk. It could happen.

some time in the near future, a Canadien farm boy, a Flin Flonner if you will, will cause nashing of the teeth and rending of the clothes by signing with Moscow or Dinamo Riiga. Brett Hull did it with the WHA, it is bound to happen with this upstart league which is getting legs. And after one, there will be more. Ovechkin, Datsyuk or a KOVALCHUK returning home while still in their prime is almost a certainty. The Russian league is here to stay and is now ready to be a threat to the NHL.

I just wanted to quote myself, I wrote this last year. Sometimes I amaze myself, lol.
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Don't get too amazed...it's Bobby Hull, not Brett. :P

Well, I'm amazed, he called Kovy. @yave1964, do you mind picking my lottery numbers for this week?

(Great piece btw. Good to recall it for us 'newbies' here....lol)

Edited by goalnut3133
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