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Tye McGinn - Broken Orbital Bone - Out 2 Weeks


Digityman
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In case you need an extra reason to justify the Philadelphia Flyers trading for Simon Gagne, here it is: young forward Tye McGinn will miss at least two weeks with a broken orbital bone, according to CSNPhilly.com.

McGinn, 22, suffered the injury thanks to this rugged fight with Toronto Maple Leafs tough guy Mike Brown, which happened during Toronto’s 4-2 win on Monday:

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Source Edited by Digityman
Not sure what happened with the first....
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Maybe there is a better angle but it looked to me on the last take down his forehead smacked the ice so it wasn't all fist...although he landed a few i swear it looked likehe hit his head...oh well details... :huh:

That's exactly what I thought when I was watching the fight during the game yesterday. Head hit the ice.

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if it was going to be a concussion

That's just what I said to my wife. Totally was my first, gut reaction.

Edit - I thought he was done for the night with a head injury. I spent the first 5 minutes of the next period looking for his number out on the ice. Frankly, I was surprised when I saw him. Thought that was encouraging. Because I was thinking concussion.

Edited by OH1FlyersFan
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@OH1FlyersFan

Hey, I was just thinking about this while talking to @flyerrod: I'm just wondering if smacking your face like that would to that to an orbital bone. It just seems like it's shaped in a way that it might be a bit more protected from hitting a flat surface like that. I could see a nose or *maybe" a cheek bone (or chin). But I'm wondering about the orbital bone. What do you think? (Just from an academic standpoint. Practically speaking, it really doesn't matter as it's broken and he's out for two weeks either way).

Just glad it was not a concussion.

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@ruxpin

I am pretty sure that the orbital bone (which is directly under your eye) would be difficult to fracture even if you face plant into the ice. There are just too many other facial bones that would break first......

Yeah, I agree. So I'm leaning back to the idea it was the punch that did it.

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@OH1FlyersFan

Hey, I was just thinking about this while talking to @flyerrod: I'm just wondering if smacking your face like that would to that to an orbital bone. It just seems like it's shaped in a way that it might be a bit more protected from hitting a flat surface like that. I could see a nose or *maybe" a cheek bone (or chin). But I'm wondering about the orbital bone. What do you think? (Just from an academic standpoint. Practically speaking, it really doesn't matter as it's broken and he's out for two weeks either way).

Just glad it was not a concussion.

@ruxpin

I am pretty sure that the orbital bone (which is directly under your eye) would be difficult to fracture even if you face plant into the ice. There are just too many other facial bones that would break first......

There are 6 or 7 bones (depending on the source) that make up the orbit. One of those is the zygoma or zygomatic arch. That is the bone under your eye most commonly refered to as the cheek bone. That bone is also the most common bone to fracture in a fight or a faceplant on the ice.

Edited by AlaskaFlyerFan
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There are 6 or 7 bones (depending on the source) that make up the orbit. One of those is the zygoma or zygomatic arch. That is the bone under your eye most commonly refered to as the cheek bone. That bone is also the most common bone to fracture in a fight or a faceplant on the ice.

what about the bone above the eyes - along the eyebrow ridge? Is that part of the orbital? I can see coming down on that and cracking it if there's a slight protrusion of that bone, but then that's maybe more part of the skull cap I suppose. And also the helmet would tend to protect the forehead and that area more, unless it was being pushed back off the head. I have no idea, actually.

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what about the bone above the eyes - along the eyebrow ridge? Is that part of the orbital? I can see coming down on that and cracking it if there's a slight protrusion of that bone, but then that's maybe more part of the skull cap I suppose. And also the helmet would tend to protect the forehead and that area more, unless it was being pushed back off the head. I have no idea, actually.

The bone above the eye is the frontal bone and it is part of the orbit. Typically, the helmet would protect that bone but Brown & McGinn took off their helmets before they started throwing.

In humans, seven bones make up the bony orbit:

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There are 6 or 7 bones (depending on the source) that make up the orbit. One of those is the zygoma or zygomatic arch. That is the bone under your eye most commonly refered to as the cheek bone. That bone is also the most common bone to fracture in a fight or a faceplant on the ice.

Very helpful. Thanks!

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