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Scott Stevens to coach the Devils Defense


hf101
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Scott Stevens is now in charge of the defense for the New Jersey Devils.

From PuckDaddy, Stevens, 48, worked the last two seasons as a special assignment coach for the Devils, spending some time in Albany working with the defensemen there and attending all of the Devils' home games. He spent the 2009-10 season as a part-time assistant under Jacques Lemaire and did not travel to most of the team's road games or go behind the bench. Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello said Stevens will be a full-time assistant now and DeBoer plans to have him on the bench to run the team's defense.

Emphasis on "run," considering how Stevens used to defend.

Lamoriello has been trying to get Stevens as a full-time assistant since he was brought on as a "roving instructor" about three years ago. From the Star Ledger in Aug. 2009:

"Winning breeds winning," Lamoriello said. "Commitment breeds commitment. He brings intensity. Scotty was a leader by example. It's great to be able to tap his knowledge. And he has a charisma."

Do you think the Devils will be a tougher team to play against this season? They lost some offense with Parise signing with the Wild, but I expect the defense will take a page back to the 90's - early 2000's. This could play well into Volchenkov, Tallindar, and Salvador's style. Will we see more clutch and grab as we saw in the playoffs?

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  • 1 month later...

Stevens can show them how to go for their opponents heads. Dirty player IMO.

Why dirty? Stevens kept his arms down and feet on the ice. Perhaps one if the cleanest hard knocks punishing defenseman in his day. Just didn't like him or have specific examples? I hated playing Jersey's clutch & grab crap, but always respected Stevens for what he brought game in, game out.

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Why dirty? Stevens kept his arms down and feet on the ice.

i remember him differently, i remember a guy who would get his elbows up when he could, and didn't mind a good 2 count before laying a guy out once the puck was gone. i thought he was worse when he played for the caps as far as the (wink wink nod nod) bending of the rules went. he was a hard guy to play against and players needed to have their wits about them when he was on the ice. i thought the hit on paul kariya was probably the worst, but there were many similar plays throughout his career.

i have no doubt that the devils will be harder to play against given their personnel and coach.

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Stevens was a really good defenseman. However, whenever he got a chance to seriously hurt someone, he took it. That type of goon doesn't deserve any respect. Putting bruises on an opponent is one thing, but intentionally trying to maim a player is the act of a coward.

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@mojo1917

Right on both counts.

I was debating that hit with a Devils fan buddy of mine before one of playoff games last year. He said "you don't really think he was trying to take him out do you?" I said yeah I think Stevens was trying to cripple him. But Lindros' bad habit of looking down made it possible.

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His hits are mostly dead center of the chest with his shoulder. If your head was down, ala Lindros, you kissed his shoulder, no doubt, but legal AND common back then. He was notorious for cutting across the blue line and laying you out, also ala Lindros. You can't blame Stevens for Lindros being hurt in a collision that is STILL commonplace in the game (aka Kronwall). They're clean hits in those days. The league should've changed that long before then, and there was no etiquette to avoid them. It's not like Stevens broke some honor code.

Heck I'd bet given the chance Lindros would've thrown the exact same check to anyone else.

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It's not like Stevens broke some honor code.

if you are referring to the Lindros ecf hit, i agree. i can easily think of 6 or 7 other instances where he cleaned a guy out well after the puck was played, and that is a violation of the rules and the "code". like i said the hit on paul karyia in the cup finals was the best example of what i'm talking about, late by a good second and a half with an evil intent. and he was a lot more reckless as a capital.

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if you are referring to the Lindros ecf hit, i agree. i can easily think of 6 or 7 other instances where he cleaned a guy out well after the puck was played, and that is a violation of the rules and the "code". like i said the hit on paul karyia in the cup finals was the best example of what i'm talking about, late by a good second and a half with an evil intent. and he was a lot more reckless as a capital.

I dunno though mojo... I'm watching the Kariya hit now as it's been so long, but the hit can't be but two seconds after he dumps the puck off. Kariya literally takes one stride, and gets his skate just barely down on a second step when he's hit. Again in today's rule book, as before, the contact with the head is the issue which is why I think half of Kronwall's hits are dirty, but back then... his arm is down and elbow not extended. I don't see it as late... this is all assuming you mean Game 6 of the 2003 Cup series. The announcers say it's late... but in today's game there are loads of hits two or three seconds after the puck is dumped away. If you really get literal with the rules, ANY hit after the puck is gone is interference. There's no clear cut time in the rules where it's okay to hit like that. Yet it happens every single game. I don't see two steps at that speed as horribly late.

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@Polaris922

well here's another instance of we'll just have to agree to disagree. There's not much you can present to change my opinion of that guy's play.

Brings up an interesting thought though... I wonder how many player injuries would be avoided if the rule were enforced to the letter. No contact after they pass/shoot the puck. Would it sissify the game? Or would it protect star players (Kariya, Lindros, Havlat, etc etc) from late hits that have given them concussions?

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@Polaris922

I don't know, the game is so fast, that rule is very hard to enforce even loosely. just like contact with a quarterback in football, after you've beaten the tackle and are bearing down on the qb it's tough to let up once you've layed out to make the hit. hockey is a contact sport , to crack down on the enforcement of that rule as we're imagining here would create an constant parade to the penalty box and eternal power play which i don't think is good for the game. i think the league is actually making an effort to keep the hitting in the game by enforcing the "head as primary contact point" policy. i think the refereeing of the big open ice hit is difficult and subjective and i'd be fine for the zebras to err on the side of safety.

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@mojo1917

Agree on all points. That might be something players just couldn't "adjust" to, because you're lining me up for a hit, I see you coming, and dump the puck off just before you hit me so you get the penalty for something you're already committed to. I just don't know how the stripes judge the "lateness" of a hit. Two strides? three? four? one? I dunno. Purely subjective at all times.

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